infomantic

a work in progress

donganhillslibrary:

Not necessarily in that order but you get the picture. ;-)

donganhillslibrary:

Not necessarily in that order but you get the picture. ;-)

(Source: icecreamtees.com )

Two weeks ago a man in France was arrested for raping his daughter. She’d gone to her school counselor and then the police, but they needed “hard evidence.” So, she videotaped her next assault. Her father was eventually arrested. His attorney explained, “There was a period when he was unemployed and in the middle of a divorce. He insists that these acts did not stretch back further than three or four months. His daughter says longer. But everyone should be very careful in what they say.” Because, really, even despite her seeking help, her testimony, her bravery in setting up a webcam to film her father raping her, you really can’t believe what the girl says, can you?

Everyone “knows” this. Even children.

Three years ago, in fly-on-the-wall fashion of parent drivers everywhere, I listened while a 14-year-old girl in the back seat of my car described how angry she was that her parents had stopped allowing her to walk home alone just because a girl in her neighborhood “claimed she was raped.” When I asked her if there was any reason to think the girl’s story was not true, she said, “Girls lie about rape all the time.” She didn’t know the person, she just assumed she was lying…

No one says, “You can’t trust women,” but distrust them we do. College students surveyed revealed that they think up to 50% of their female peers lie when they accuse someone of rape, despite wide-scale evidence and multi-country studies that show the incident of false rape reports to be in the 2%-8% range, pretty much the same as false claims for other crimes. As late as 2003, people jokingly (wink, wink) referred to Philadelphia’s sex crimes unit as “the lying bitch unit.” If an 11-year-old girl told an adult that her father took out a Craigslist ad to find someone to beat and rape her while he watched, as recently actually occurred, what do you think the response would be? Would she need to provide a videotape after the fact?

It goes way beyond sexual assault as well. That’s just the most likely and obvious demonstration of “women are born to lie” myths. Women’s credibility is questioned in the workplace, in courts, by law enforcement, in doctors’ offices, and in our political system. People don’t trust women to be bosses, or pilots, or employees. Pakistan’s controversial Hudood Ordinance still requires a female rape victim to procure four male witnesses to her rape or risk prosecution for adultery. In August, a survey of managers in the United States revealed that they overwhelmingly distrust women who request flextime. It’s notable, of course, that women are trusted to be mothers—the largest pool of undervalued, unpaid, economically crucial labor.

jawn-i-am-not-wearing-a-fez:

“What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet or excite you. Books help us understand who we are and how we are to behave. They show us what community and friendship mean; they show us how to live and die.” — Anne Lamott

Books? Boooooks….

(Source: findoutwhereyourplaceis, via nocompromise-noregrets)

sinkling:

Crazy little furballs by Dj Munnskol on Flickr.

Konstruktion Kittens

sinkling:

Crazy little furballs by Dj Munnskol on Flickr.

Konstruktion Kittens

(via kittehkats)

andersoncountylibrary:

Always reblog.

Truer words…

andersoncountylibrary:

Always reblog.

Truer words…

(Source: npr, via lawrencepubliclibrary)

libraryjournal:


Boys in the late 1970s probably assumed the girls comic Misty was all boring romance, puppies and ponies. How wrong they were. They were full of “incredibly dark, weird, psychologically harrowing” stories with “trippy and odd” artwork, said John Harris Dunning.
Dunning is co-curator, with Paul Gravett, of what will be the UK’s biggest exhibition of British comics, taking in everything from newly discovered Victorian comics to modern classics such as V for Vendetta.
The summer show, entitled Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK, is being staged by the British Library which holds the complete output of the British comics industry but said it had not in the past done the genre justice.
Roly Keating, the library’s chief executive, said: “It is fair to say, if we are being honest, that we haven’t devoted to that sector of our collection the scholarly and curatorial effort we have devoted to some of the higher culture parts of our collection. This year we are addressing that with a vengeance.”

Page Misty for me! British Library plans long overdue exhibition on British comics.

libraryjournal:

Boys in the late 1970s probably assumed the girls comic Misty was all boring romance, puppies and ponies. How wrong they were. They were full of “incredibly dark, weird, psychologically harrowing” stories with “trippy and odd” artwork, said John Harris Dunning.

Dunning is co-curator, with Paul Gravett, of what will be the UK’s biggest exhibition of British comics, taking in everything from newly discovered Victorian comics to modern classics such as V for Vendetta.

The summer show, entitled Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK, is being staged by the British Library which holds the complete output of the British comics industry but said it had not in the past done the genre justice.

Roly Keating, the library’s chief executive, said: “It is fair to say, if we are being honest, that we haven’t devoted to that sector of our collection the scholarly and curatorial effort we have devoted to some of the higher culture parts of our collection. This year we are addressing that with a vengeance.”

Page Misty for me! British Library plans long overdue exhibition on British comics.

(Source: theguardian.com)

iowawomensarchives:

For many librarians, the urge to collect and preserve the record of human culture isn’t checked at the door on the way out of the office. Just ask Mary Noble, who worked as a cataloger for over three decades at the University of Iowa Libraries. In her off hours, she scoured flea markets and antique stores for items to augment her personal collection of historic photographs, glass plate negatives, photographic postcards and related materials.

Since it’s also difficult for librarians to resist sharing information, Mary donated her collection to the Iowa Women’s Archives in 1992; the materials have since become a valuable resource for scholarship on women’s history, Iowa history, and photography. She continues to purchase new items for the IWA’s Noble Photograph Collection, which has shifted in focus to emphasize women photographers and images of women. Mary states that additional selection criteria include “images… that I hope will be useful, interesting or just plain fun.”

Iowa Digital Library: Noble photographs

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Noble photograph collection, 1870-1979

Books at Iowa: “Iowa’s women professional photographers” by Mary E. Noble

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

Bonus!: Library school class photo [Mary Noble in front row, far right], University of Iowa, 1968

grett:

little Juicy by asya baranova on Flickr.

D’aww, cat!

grett:

little Juicy by asya baranova on Flickr.

D’aww, cat!

(via catp0rn)